reblogged via latimes:

Cloud computing and Internet use suck energy and emit CO2, says Greenpeace. “Clicking on all those viral videos, chain emails, celebrity tweets and paparazzi photos online sucks up enough energy to rank the Internet — if it were a country — fifth in the world for electricity use, reports Tiffany Hsu.
Photo: Facebook displays a new server that is part of the company’s efforts to become more energy efficient. Credit: Kimihiro Hoshino / AFP/Getty Images

reblogged via latimes:

Cloud computing and Internet use suck energy and emit CO2, says Greenpeace. “Clicking on all those viral videos, chain emails, celebrity tweets and paparazzi photos online sucks up enough energy to rank the Internet — if it were a country — fifth in the world for electricity use, reports Tiffany Hsu.

Photo: Facebook displays a new server that is part of the company’s efforts to become more energy efficient. Credit: Kimihiro Hoshino / AFP/Getty Images

reblogged via latimes:

Washington Post Co. launched its venture into social media on Wednesday with news aggregation website Trove, which filters content from more than 10,000 media sources according to a user’s preferences. We’re still diving into Trove ourselves, but by far the most amazing part of the site is the intro video, created by Next Media Animation.

Google Fiber in Kansas City, Kan., free to schools, available to public in 2012

From the L.A. Times Technology blog:

Google detailed on Wednesday its Google Fiber Internet service, which will launch first in Kansas City, Kan., promising free broadband Web access for schools and speeds 100 times faster than the current average.

"In about 1995, 15 years ago roughly, everyone was living on 56 kilobits, and it was awful," said Patrick Pichette, Google’s chief financial officer. "And then somebody invented a 5-meg modem, and everybody was saying, what are you going to do with 5 megs. … Think what you’re going to do with a gigabit; 1,000 megabits."

Photo: Google Chief Financial Officer Patrick Pichette announces Kansas City, Kan., as the first city where it will offer its Google Fiber service, on March 30, 2011, at Wyandotte High School. Credit: David Eulitt / Kansas City Star/MCT

Google to toughen privacy policy, undergo regular audits, in FTC settlement

From the L.A. Times Technology blog:

Google Inc., has agreed to implement a comprehensive privacy policy and undergo 20 years of independent audits as part of a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission in connection with charges that it used deceptive tactics and violated promises to customers when launching its Buzz social network last year.

The terms of the settlement, announced Wednesday, were among the toughest ever handed out by federal regulators in a privacy case.

It was the first time the FTC has required a company to put in place a sweeping privacy policy to protect consumer data, the agency said.

latimes:

Obama announced his plan to reduce oil imports to the United States by one-third, Neela Banerjee reports. In this photo, Libyan rebel fighters collect the last remaining drops of gasoline from the tanks of a filling station in Ras Lanuf, Libya.
Photo credit: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

latimes:

Obama announced his plan to reduce oil imports to the United States by one-third, Neela Banerjee reports. In this photo, Libyan rebel fighters collect the last remaining drops of gasoline from the tanks of a filling station in Ras Lanuf, Libya.

Photo credit: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Evan Williams, former Twitter CEO, says he's not disappearing from the company

Ev Williams

From the L.A. Times Technology blog:

Evan Williams is spending less time these days around the San Francisco offices of Twitter, a company he co-founded and once ran as CEO.

But Williams isn’t gone from Twitter altogether — despite former Chief Operating Officer Dick Costolo taking over as chief executive last fall, and fellow co-founder Jack Dorsey taking over Williams’ post-CEO role of leading product development.

 ”As was reported in various places yesterday, I’ve decided to scale back my role at the company. (I’m still involved, but it’s no longer my full-time job.),” Williams wrote in a post on his personal Evhead blog.

"I’m not ready to talk about what I have planned next, but I will venture a prediction about what’s next for Twitter: It will be bigger and better."

Photo: Evan Williams’ Twitter profile picture. Credit: Evan Williams/Twitter

Facebook may help identify those with depression, study says

latimes:

“For the study, researchers at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health analyzed the Facebook profiles of 200 college sophomores and juniors. They found that 25 percent of the students showed one or more symptoms of depression — including references to decreased interest or pleasure in activities, change in appetite, sleep problems, loss of energy and feelings of guilt or worthlessness,” reports Linda Shrieves.

Jack Dorsey returns to Twitter full time, will remain Square CEO

From the L.A. Times Technology blog:

Jack Dorsey is back full-time at Twitter, leading product development as executive chairman.

 Dorsey, who is Twitter’s chairman and one its co-founders, has been in talks for the new daily responsibilities since at least last week.

Twitter Chief Executive Dick Costolo announced the new position for Dorsey in a tweet Monday morning, writing: “Excited that Twitter Chairman @jack will be returning to the company day-to-day leading product as Executive Chairman.

Dorsey followed up with a tweet of his own about the move, saying, “Today I’m thrilled to get back to work at @Twitter leading product as Executive Chairman. And yes: leading @Square forevermore as CEO. #200%”

Photo: Jack Dorsey’s Twitter profile picture. Credit: Jack Dorsey/Twitter

Bertrand Serlet, often called 'the father of Mac OS X,' is leaving Apple

From the L.A. Times Technology blog:

Bertrand Serlet, Apple’s senior vice president of Mac software engineering, announced Wednesday morning that he’s leaving the Cupertino tech giant.

Serlet, whom many have called “the father of Mac OS X,” has worked alongside Apple’s Chief Executive Steve Jobs for more than two decades at both Apple and NeXT, the short-lived computer company that Jobs started after being forced to leave Apple in 1985.

Jobs returned to Apple in 1996 in a deal that saw Apple buy NeXT, and in 1997 he hired Serlet to head the development of Mac OS X.

"I’ve worked with Steve for 22 years and have had an incredible time developing products at both NeXT and Apple, but at this point, I want to focus less on products and more on science," Serlet said in a statement issued by Apple.

Replacing Serlet will be Craig Federighi, Apple’s current vice president of Mac software engineering. Federighi will take over Serlet’s role as senior VP of Mac software and, like Serlet, report to Jobs.

Photo: Bertrand Serlet, left, and Craig Federighi in 2009. Credit: Robert Galbraith / Reuters